Classic Video Games Nintendo Wii

Nintendo Wii Images

The images of the Nintendo Wii are categorized and show the console, joystick controllers and accessories. You will also find detailed close-ups of the ports and connections available on the Wii.

Nintendo Wii Image Navigation:


Nintendo Wii Box

Nintendo Wii in box The front of the Nintendo Wii in box with Wii Sports as the pack-in game. The Wii was released in North America on November 19, 2006 and has fared much better than previous Nintendo consoles in both sales figures and broad appeal. I've always felt it catered to a younger audience, but it has a good mix of genres. One drawback is it's unique development environment that doesn't allow easy porting of games from other consoles.
Nintendo Wii in box Back of the Nintendo Wii box. The Wii Remote, can be used as a handheld pointing device and detects movement in 3 dimensions. Another notable feature of the console is WiiConnect24, which enables it to receive messages and updates over the Internet while in standby mode.
Nintendo Wii in box The Nintendo Wii box. The Wii is Nintendo's 5th home gaming console, and the successor of the GameCube, with most models being fully backward compatible with all GameCube games and most accessories. Nintendo's spelling of "Wii" with two lower-case "i" characters is meant to resemble 2 people, representing players gathering together, as well as to represent the Wii Remote and Nunchuk.

Nintendo Wii Console

Nintendo Wii  Wii Console Nintendo Wii Console. 21 games were announced for launch day in North and South America, with another 12 announced for release in 2006. Wii Sports was included with the console bundle in all regions excluding Japan and South Korea.
Nintendo Wii  Wii Console Nintendo Wii Console in a vertical orientation. Both Microsoft and Sony take losses producing their consoles in the hopes of making a long-term profit on software sales. Nintendo has optimized production costs resulting in a significant profit margin with each Wii unit sold.
Nintendo Wii  Wii Console Nintendo Wii Console viewed from the right. The Wii is Nintendo's smallest console to date. Measuring 44 mm (1.73 in) wide, 157 mm (6.18 in) tall and 215.4 mm (8.48 in) deep in its vertical orientation.
Nintendo Wii  Wii Console Nintendo Wii Console, upright in base, viewed from the right. The prefix for the numbering scheme of the system and its parts and accessories is "RVL" after its code name, "Revolution".
Nintendo Wii  Wii Console Nintendo Wii Console viewed from the left. The console features an illuminated slot-loading optical media drive that accepts only 12 cm Wii Optical Discs and 8 cm Nintendo GameCube Game Discs. The blue light in the disc slot illuminates briefly when the console is turned on and pulsates when new data is received through WiiConnect24. The disc mechanism does not play DVD-Video, DVD-Audio, or Compact Discs.
Nintendo Wii  Wii Console Rear view of the Nintendo Wii Console. The Wii console contains 512 megabytes of internal flash memory and an SD card slot for external storage for uploading photos as well as backing up saved game data and downloaded Virtual Console and WiiWare games.
Nintendo Wii  Wii Console Rear view of the Nintendo Wii Console. Players can load Virtual Console and WiiWare games directly from the SD card. An update allows the use of SDHC cards, increasing the limit on SD card size from 2 GB to 32 GB
Nintendo Wii  Wii Console Right-side view of the Nintendo Wii Console's upper cover for the 4 GameCube controller ports. Nintendo has always been a leader in backward compatibility. Including FOUR GameCube ports was an awesome move on their part!
Nintendo Wii  Wii Console side view of the Nintendo Wii Console's upper covers for the 4 GameCube controller ports and 2 slots for GameCube memory cards. One card is shown in slot 1.
Nintendo Wii GameCube memory slots Nintendo Wii with the front cover open showing the SD card slot and Synch button. The Wii console is able to connect to the Internet through its built-in 802.11b/g Wi-Fi or through a USB-to-Ethernet adapter, with both methods allowing players to access the Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection service.
Nintendo Wii GameCube set-up Nintendo Wii with a GameCube controller plugged in.

Nintendo Wii Controllers - WiiMote

Nintendo Wii Controller Original (standard) Nintendo Wii Controller. It uses a combination of built-in accelerometers and infrared detection to sense its position in 3D space when pointed at the LEDs within the Sensor Bar. This allows players to control games using physical gestures as well as traditional button presses.
Nintendo Wii Controller Original (standard) Nintendo Wii Controller. The controller connects to the console using Bluetooth.
Nintendo Wii Controller Original (standard) Nintendo Wii Controller with wrist strap. Many gamers weren't familiar with a motion control device and many TVs (and other household items) were damaged by Wii remotes flying out of user's hands. Nintendo offered a better wrist strap and textured sleeve.
Nintendo Wii Controller Original (standard) Nintendo Wii Controller showing the underside B button and IR. The Wii MotionPlus is an accessory that connects to the Wii Remote to supplement the accelerometer and Sensor Bar capabilities and enable actions to be rendered identically on the screen in real time.
Nintendo Wii Controller Nintendo Wii Controller with Motion Plus add-on. The added sensitivity of Motion Plus could be added to the original Wii controllers via a protective sleeve containing the small add-on unit.
Nintendo Wii Controller Nintendo Wii Controller with Motion Plus add-on attached. The Wii system supports wireless connectivity with the Nintendo DS without any additional accessories. This connectivity allows the player to use the DS microphone and touchscreen as inputs for Wii games.
Nintendo Wii's nunchuck port Nintendo Wii Controller's nunchuk port.
Nintendo Wii's nunchuck port Close up of the Nintendo Wii Controller.
Nintendo Wii's nunchuck port Close up of the Nintendo Wii Controller.
Nunchuck for the Nintendo Wii Controller Nunchuk for the Nintendo Wii Controller.
Nunchuck for the Nintendo Wii Controller Nunchuk for the Nintendo Wii Controller.
Nintendo Wii Controller with nunchuck attached Nintendo Wii Controller with nunchuk attached.
Nintendo Wii Controller with NES skin from Nintendo Power magazine Nintendo Wii Controller with NES-style skin that came bundled in an issue of Nintendo Power magazine.

Nintendo Wii Classic Controller Pro

Nintendo Wii Classic Controller Pro Nintendo Wii Classic Controller Pro box. In April 2010, Nintendo released the Classic Controller Pro (North America) which functions much the same as the original Classic Controller, but has digital shoulder buttons.
Nintendo Wii Classic Controller Pro Nintendo Wii Classic Controller Pro is primarily for Virtual Console games that use features more similar to the older Nintendo NES and SNES controllers (aka- they need more buttons than found on a WiiMote). It is not compatible with GameCube games.
Nintendo Wii Classic Controller Pro Info from the back of the Classic Controller Pro box.
Nintendo Wii Classic Controller Pro Shaped more like a GameCube controller, the Classic Controller's analog sticks which are spaced farther apart than the original.
Nintendo Wii Classic Controller Pro Similar to the Classic controller Pro, a GameCube controller can be used to playing most Virtual Console games.
Nintendo Wii Classic Controller Pro The Classic controller Pro is connected to the Wiimote, much like a Nunchuk, allowing it to maintain the Wii's wireless connectivity.
Nintendo Wii Classic Controller Pro Top view of the Classic Controller Pro.
Nintendo Wii Classic Controller Pro Front view of the Classic Controller Pro showing the shoulder buttons.

Nintendo Wii & Wii U Wired Fight Pads

Nintendo Wii & Wii U Wired Fight Pad The Nintendo Wired Fight Pad is styled after the popular GameCube controller and made by PDP.
Nintendo Wii & Wii U Wired Fight Pad The Nintendo Wired Fight Pad box - side view. Like the Pro Controllers, these connect to the Wiimote the same way a nunchuk is attached.
Nintendo Wii & Wii U Wired Fight Pad The Nintendo Wired Fight Pad boxes. Designed primarily for Super SMash Bros. on the Wii U, these controllers are also Wii compatible with any games that can use the Pro Controllers.
Nintendo Wii & Wii U Wired Fight Pad The Nintendo Wired Fight Pad box - back view.

Nintendo Wii Ports & Connections

Nintendo Wii GameCube controller ports Close up of the Nintendo Wii's four GameCube ports.
Nintendo Wii GameCube memory slots Close up on the Nintendo Wii's two GameCube memory card slots.
Nintendo Wii SD Card Close up on the Nintendo Wii's front cover with SD card in slot.
Nintendo Wii dual USB slots Close up on the Nintendo Wii's dual USB slots.
Nintendo Wii dual USB slots Close up on the Nintendo Wii's rear ports. The red port is the connection for the sensor bar that typically sits in front of the TV. The power port is at the bottom and the vertical port is the Multi out for connecting the audio and video to the TV/stereo. The cooling fan is just above these ports.

Nintendo Wii Media

Nintendo Wii with a game disc inserted Nintendo Wii with a game disc inserted. Retail copies of games are supplied on proprietary, DVD-like Wii Optical Discs packaged in a keep case along with instruction information.
Nintendo Wii with a game disc inserted Nintendo Wii with a Gamecube game disc inserted.

Blue Nintendo Wii / Activision's Skylanders Giants Bundle

Blue Nintendo Wii / Activision's Skylanders Giants Bundle box Blue Wii / Activision Skylanders Giants bundle box. About the time I decided to get a back-up Wii, Skylanders Giants came out and this bundle appeared at my local Toys R Us at a really great price.
Blue Nintendo Wii / Activision's Skylanders Giants Bundle box Back of the Blue Wii / Activision Skylanders Giants bundle box.
Blue Nintendo Wii / Activision's Skylanders Giants Bundle The front of the Blue Wii. This is the "Family Edition" meaning it has no GameCube support and is designed to be horizontally oriented as a stand no longer comes with this unit.
Blue Nintendo Wii / Activision's Skylanders Giants Bundle OK, you can use it vertically. You'll notice the lettering is now horizontally oriented for the Family Edition console.
Blue Nintendo Wii / Activision's Skylanders Giants Bundle The front of the Blue Wii showing the power, reset & eject buttons. The door/flap is open showing the SD card slot and Synch button for the wireless controllers.
Blue Nintendo Wii / Activision's Skylanders Giants Bundle The left side of the Blue Wii.
Blue Nintendo Wii / Activision's Skylanders Giants Bundle The right side of the Blue Wii showing the grated vent.
Blue Nintendo Wii / Activision's Skylanders Giants Bundle The rear of the Blue Wii showing the A/C power, A/V Out, Sensor Bar port and dual USB ports. The fan is behind the vented grate.

Blue Nintendo Wii Controllers

Blue Nintendo Wii / Activision's Skylanders Giants Bundle The Blue Wiimote controller has WiiMotion Plus built into it.
Blue Nintendo Wii / Activision's Skylanders Giants Bundle The Blue Wiimote controller.
Blue Nintendo Wii / Activision's Skylanders Giants Bundle The bottom end of the Blue Wiimote controller where the Nunchuk connects.
Blue Nintendo Wii / Activision's Skylanders Giants Bundle The top end of the Blue Wiimote controller showing the IR port.
Blue Nintendo Wii / Activision's Skylanders Giants Bundle The Blue Wiimote controller Nunchuk.

Blue Nintendo Wii Ports & Connections

Blue Nintendo Wii / Activision's Skylanders Giants Bundle The front of the Blue Wii showing the SD card slot sand Sync button.
Blue Nintendo Wii / Activision's Skylanders Giants Bundle The rear of the Blue Wii showing the A/C power, A/V Out and Sensor Bar ports.
Blue Nintendo Wii / Activision's Skylanders Giants Bundle The rear of the Blue Wii showing the 2 USB ports.

Nintendo Wii Mini - Box

Wii Mini box and packaging You have to like coming home from work to find a Wii Mini waiting at the door. Originally released in Canada in Dec 2012, we got ours about a year later not knowing that there would be a North American release in Nov. 2013.
Wii Mini box and packaging The front of the Wii Mini box. It was released in Canada on December 7, 2012, in Europe on March 15, 2013, in the United Kingdom on March 22, 2013, and in the United States on November 17, 2013.
Wii Mini box and packaging The top of the Wii Mini box.
Wii Mini box and packaging Three-quarter view of the Wii Mini box.
Wii Mini box and packaging Top compartment of the Wii Mini box showing the slot where the manual and pack-in game are placed. For a scaled back game console, Nintendo has done a really nice job with the packaging.
Wii Mini box and packaging Once the top compartment is opened up, the Wii Mini console and power supply can be seen. The red Wiimote and nunchuk are under the console.

Nintendo Wii Mini Console

Wii Mini console Front of the Wii Mini. unlike prior models, it uses large-scale integration, where a single chip combines its two processors (system and graphics) with it's input/output.
Wii Mini console Front right side of the Wii Mini. The initial release didn't come with a pack-in game, but Mario Kart Wii was included at no charge beginning on September 18, 2013 in Canada and from launch in the United States.
Wii Mini console Front left side of the Wii Mini.
Wii Mini console Rear of the Wii Mini.
Wii Mini console Bottom of the Wii Mini.
Wii Mini console FCC info on the bottom of the Wii Mini.
Wii Mini console The front of the Wii Mini with the lid open. Part of scaling back and saving money on this low-cost Wii involved removing the auto-intake slot the other models had for loading game discs. The Wii Mini has a release button for this lid much like the GameCube.
Wii Mini console The Wii Mini with matching Wiimote and nunchuk.
Wii Mini console The Wii Mini with a game disc inserted on the spindel. Games click into place like they did on the GameCube.
Wii Mini Console Close up of the Wii Mini's disc mechanism.
Wii Mini Console Close up of the Wii Mini's "Power" button.
Wii Mini Console Close up of the Wii Mini's "Open" button for inserting/removing game discs.
Wii Mini Console The Wii Mini is vented on both sides.

Nintendo Wii Mini Ports & Connections

Wii Mini Ports & Connections The vent, battery cover and Synch button on the Wii Mini's left side. The Synch button allows you to synchronize Wiimotes with the system. The Wii Mini uses a CR Coin Lithium battery.
Wii Mini Ports & Connections Ports on the rear of the Wii Mini. Power input (DC 12V), A/V Output to TV and the Sensor Bar connection.
Wii Mini Ports & Connections Ports on the rear of the Wii Mini. USB port.

Nintendo Wii Media: Activision's Skylanders

Activision Skylanders game box Activision Skylanders game box cover. I'm stunned by the innovation of a game that brings a unique wireless component to the game allowing a completely different way to integrate characters and scenarios into a video game.
Activision Skylanders game box Activision Skylanders game box rear cover showing all the available characters that can be purchased. Each one has unique abilities to assist with various tasks or challenges within the game.
Activision Skylanders 3-pack of additional characters Activision Skylanders 3-pack of additional characters.
Activision Skylanders portal Activision Skylanders portal on which character figures are placed. This portal connects wirelessly to the Wii via a small USB dongle that attaches to the rear of the console. It runs on 3 AA batteries which give it a pretty good supply of power.
Activision Skylanders portal This portal came with the Skylanders Giants / Blue Wii bundle. You can see that this model has a cable connection - not wireless.
Activision Skylanders case Activision Skylanders case. This castle-designed case opens up to hold 8 Skylander figures and the Portal.
Activision Skylanders case Side view of the Activision Skylanders case and packaging.
Activision Skylanders case Rear view of the Activision Skylanders case showing how the figures and the Portal fit in.

Nintendo Wii Accessories

Wii game controller shell / insert This seems like a dreadful idea, but the Wiimote fits inside this shell to give it an SNES look & feel. Dubious at best.
Wii game controller shell / insert Back side of the controller shell.
Raving Rabbids charging station for 2 Nintendo Wii game controllers Raving Rabbids charging station for 2 Nintendo Wii controllers. It comes with 2 rechargeable batteries that integrate into the Wii remotes. I love Raving Rabbids, but this is a fairly old unit and is designed for the original size Wii controllers, not the longer ones with the added Motion+ units. Thus to charge the batteries I need to remove the detachable Motion+ parts. I'm guessing it may line up properly with the all-in-one Motion+ controllers.
Nintendo Wii Sling Bag Nintendo Sling Bag for transporting your Wii console. I remember shoving my Atari 2600 into a backpack, with a bunch of games, for a sleep-over. I guess this is the modern branded equivalent.
Nintendo Wii Sling Bag There is a Wii logo in the shape of a D-pad on the top of the Nintendo Sling Bag.
Nintendo Wii Sling Bag 3/4 view of the Nintendo Sling Bag.
Nintendo Wii Sling Bag Back of the Nintendo Sling Bag packaging.
Nintendo Wii Sling Bag The Nintendo Sling Bag has a single zippered compartment with 2 mesh pockets on the interior. It has a single strap for over-the-shoulder carrying.
Nintendo Wii Sling Bag There is a pass-thru ring for connecting headphones to an MP3 player or phone in the inner pocket of the Sling Bag. This pass-thru is at the top of the bag, above the zippered compartment.
Nintendo Wii Sling Bag Back of the Nintendo Sling Bag.
Nintendo Wii Sling Bag Mesh pockets inside the Nintendo Sling Bag.
Nintendo Wii Sling Bag The zipper on the Nintendo Sling Bag has pull-tags with a controller (Wiimote) design.

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